publications

Demonstrating Value

Demonstrating Value

Interested in the benefits of wellness and occupational health services? Demonstrating Value is a tool to guide for the occupational and environmental health nurse (OHN), in selecting the best methods to demonstrate value and the value of the programming and services provided to employees.

B-Corp and Organizational Well-Being

B-Corp and Organizational Well-Being

A Dimensions Exclusive

Dimensions in OH&S became a certified B-Corporation (B-Corp) in 2013, a process that took about 6 months. I’d like to take an opportunity to explain what a B-Corp is, what the concept may mean for occupational and human resource development professionals, and why our company decided to go through the certification process.

The Next Generation of Worksite Wellness: The Next Great Profit Opportunity

The Next Generation of Worksite Wellness: The Next Great Profit Opportunity

A Dimensions Exclusive

Cutting edge wellness programs provide more than healthcare cost savings. In fact, programs focused only on this one potential benefit greatly limit what worksite wellness can do for individual and organizational well-being, as well as for organizational growth and increase in profit margins.

Pillars for Building a Thriving Culture

Pillars for Building a Thriving Culture

A Dimensions Exclusive

Developing a culture of safety and well-being is what drives commitment, engagement, and meaningful work. From this perspective safety, wellness and human resource development initiatives are integrated.

Dissertation: Do Work Relationships Matter?

Dissertation: Do work relationships matter?

Instrumental Case Study on Characteristics of Workplace Interactions that Enhance or Detract From Employee Perceptions of Well-Being & Health Behaviors

By K. Mastroianni

This exploratory instrumental qualitative case study adopted the position that health and health behaviors were complex social constructs influenced by multiple factors.

Completed in 2014

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Safety Training

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Safety Training

By D. L. Machles

Have the participants perform, and you will have a better understanding of the actual learning that took place. Originally published in Occupational Health & Safety in June 2003.

Do work relationships matter?

Do work relationships matter?

By K. Mastroianni & J. Storberg-Walker

Characteristics of workplace interactions that enhance or detract from employee perceptions of well-being and health behaviors.

Published in Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine in 2014

Community of Practice

Community of Practice

A workplace safety case study

By D. Machles, E. Bonkemeyer and J. McMichael

WHEN PEOPLE THINK OF LEARNING opportunities, they often think of training or formal teaching. Most people envision instructors (or, more recently, computers) providing information or knowledge to receptive students. This model exemplifies a transmission style of teaching where the learning process is similar to playing catch with a ball.

Originally published in Professional Safety in January 2011.

Why Safety Training May Not Be the Answer

Why Safety Training May Not Be the Answer

By D. Machles

A needs assessment or gap analysis can be performed in a number of ways. You can simply ask employees why they aren’t doing what you want them to.

Originally published in Occupational Health & Safety in March 2007.

Situated Learning

Situated Learning

New approach to SH&E training focuses on learning

By D. L. Machles

Many methods used to conduct SH&E training in today’s workplace are based on a traditional transmission perspective of teaching using objective-based instructional design.

Originally published in Professional Safety in September 2003

What are Consulting Services Worth?

What are Consulting Services Worth?

Applying Cost Analysis Techniques to Evaluate Effectiveness

By K. Mastroianni and D. Machles

Occupational health nurse consultants, whether internal or external to the organization, must document the benefit and effectiveness of services provided. In today’s business environment, it is imperative that occupational health nurse consultants demonstrate their contribution to the corporate business mission and goals.

Originally published in AAOHN Journal in January 1997.